History

Late 1970
In the late 1970’s a group of citizens with interests in video production approached the City of Napa & the Napa Valley Unified School District with an idea to start a local cable television station: The City of Napa helped give the formation committee a monetary grant of $4,000 to create a local public access station. The Napa Valley Unified School District gave the group space in a District building

1980
By the early 80’s the then "TV 6" was operating on a shoestring & mainly included school based programs. On December 30, 1985 they incorporated the station as Napa Public Access Cable Television, or NPACT, as a California Public Benefit Nonprofit Corporation, ID #C1295018 In early 1986 they were granted IRS 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt status, IRS #68-0096506


1990

In 1991 the new Franchise Agreement with then Viacom Cablevision was signed. Provisions of the new agreement relative to Napa Public Access Cable Television, NPACT, were: Grantee was to make up to two channels available for Napa’s Public, Education, and Government use. They were also to provide an initial grant of $100,000 for PEG equipment and facility upgrades and a second grant of $200,000, 30 months after signing & upon submittal by NPACT of an operating plan.NPACT began building out a studio in the Napa Unified School District Administrative Offices.

2000-2010
2004, NPACT moved to the Valley Oak High School campus. The space was remodeled to include offices, playback, and a new studio and control room.

2006, NPACT began expanding its services and signed a Franchise Agreement with the City of American Canyon, to provide cable services to American Canyon Residents. NPACT officially made its dba, Napa Valley TV, to include the entire Valley as its service area.

2008, NVTV launched 24/7 Live Streaming and Video on Demand services for all of its programming. NVTV also partnered and signed a Franchise Agreement with the Town of Yountville, which provided cable services to Yountville Residents.


2009,
NVTV updated its Franchise Agreements with Partner Cities to reflect the new Digital Infrastructure Video Competition Act (DIVCA) Ordinance enacted by the state of California. NVTV expanded its viewer base by launching TV27 and TV28 on AT&T’s U-Verse television service, which reaches 20+ cities in Northern California.

2010-2011
Rebuilt our studio green screen facility and brought our Control Room Facility up to a more technological standard by implementing Hard-Disk Recording. After over 10 years of use, we retired our old Analog SVHS record deck and now have a 100% digital, tapeless workflow for our Studio Shows. We also upgraded our staff field equipment to tapeless workflows.



2011

Created our First Annual “Boot Camp” geared for training High School Students at Napa Valley TV

2012
NVTV once again expanded its viewer base and partnered with the City of St. Helena, which provided cable services to St. Helena Residents.

2013
Napa Valley TV started airing live sports broadcasts from Memorial Stadium. Starting with Vintage High School Soccer in March, this was the first live sports broadcast in Napa Valley TV’s history. We plan to expand to various other sports, including football in the Fall 2013 School year.

Our Mission

Napa Public Access Cable Television’s mission is to provide anyone living or working in Napa County the opportunity to exercise his or her First Amendment right to expression through access to the cable television system.

In support of this mission, NPACT has adopted the following vision:
Napa Valley TV will be recognized statewide as a model for public access cable television.

NPACT PROGRAMMING PRIORITIES
NPACT specifically wishes to encourage programming designed to meet the general and specific needs of the Napa Community and to reflect the values and interests of the community. Accordingly, NPACT encourages programming of the following nature:
1. Programs produced in Napa, involving subjects, events, or people unique to the community.
2. Programs that educate the community in general or particular groups within the community about issues that affect it.
3. Programs which represent “narrow-casting”, which may be programs of limited interest and scope due to the fact that the audience for these programs are small, and/or are underserved by traditional broadcast or print media.
4. Programs exercising lawful free speech particularly when the viewpoint has little or no access to mainstream media.
5. Programs tailored to the needs of the entire Napa community.
6. Programs, which are innovative and free from traditional restrictions on length, format or subject.
7. Quality programs on subject matter demonstrating artistic or technical excellence or extraordinary effort in the planning, production or editing of the program.